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OLE'S HOURS:
Open all week
9AM – 5PM
(weather permitting)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNOWSHOEING FAQs

Is snowshoeing hard?

Snowshoeing is easy to learn so expect to have fun. If you can walk, you can snowshoe. The hardest part of snowshoeing is getting the snowshoe bindings on and properly adjusted to your boots. Ole’s staff will help you get started.
Ole’s has two easier snowshoe trails to try first. Each is three miles long.

Do I need to take a snowshoe lesson?

You don’t need to take a lesson, but we recommend signing up for a Guided Tour. This is a wonderful way to make a more intimate connection with the winter landscape. Your guide will share tips to help you be comfortable on snowshoes. You will learn you can go places on snowshoes that may be difficult to reach the rest of the year, like over frozen marshes. The guide will help you recognize details of the winter landscape, such as animal tracks, and explain what to expect outdoors in winter.

Can I use my hiking boots to snowshoe?

Hiking boots work well for snowshoeing. You can also use work boots and winter boots designed for hiking. Court shoes and running shoes probably won’t keep you warm enough for snowshoeing, unless you run! No worries, Ole’s will lend you ski boots to use with our rental snowshoes if your street shoes are not suitable.

Can my children go snowshoeing at Ole’s?

Ole’s has children’s snowshoes sized down to about age 4. Childern age 4-6 like playing in the snow. From age 6 – 8, they might venture into the woods with you. From age 9 -12, you can go for a hike together. Children will look forward to a hot chocolate or snack at trail’s end.

Ole’s rents toboggans, called pulks, you can use to pull one child along. The kids pulk can be reserved by the hour or by the day. Please call us, 802-496-3430 to reserve

Can I snowshoe even when there is no powder snow?

Yes, if trails are icy and slippery, modern snowshoes will give you great reassurance. Snowshoes now have metal teeth on the bottom called crampons. These crampons give amazing grip on ice.

What should I wear when I go snowshoeing?

Wear what you own, especially if you own clothing for alpine skiing. You can snowshoe in any weather, but if it isn’t really cold, you may be able to dress lighter than you would for alpine skiing because you won’t be sitting on a ski lift.

As with cross country skiing, take cotton out of your outfit where ever you can. When cotton gets wet, it stays wet. Some snowshoers prefer nylon pants to fleece pants because nylon sheds the snow kicked up by the snowshoes.

Don’t forget the sunblock! Winter sun reflects off snow, even on cloudy days. Bring a bottle of drinking water and some energy snacks and you are ready for your adventure.

Do I need to take ski poles when I go snowshoeing?

Poles can be helpful because they give you two more points of contact with the ground. Poles can help when climbing hills and crossing streams, but they can also get in the way in dense woods. Poles are not mandatory. You are welcome to try them for yourself.

What animals can we expect to see snowshoeing?

Winter in the snowy woods seems like a quiet time. But many creatures must still find a way to survive. While you may not see the animal searching for food, you are likely to see their tracks. Animal tracks tell a story your guide can often explain.

The following animals or their tracks are commonly seen at Ole’s:
Grey Squirrel, Red Squirrel, Coyote, Red Fox, Bobcat, Porcupine, Whitetail Deer, Horse, White-footed Mouse, Chipmunk, Ermine (Weasel in winter white coat), Skunk, Raccoon, Muskrat, and of course domestic Cats and Dogs.
The following animals are a bit less common around Ole’s, but are regular visitors:
Moose, Beaver, Fisher, Mink, Deer Mouse, Snowshoe Hare.

The following birds stay all winter: Barred Owl, Crow, Cardinal, Chickadee, Blue Jay, Junco or Snowbird, Hairy Woodpecker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Pileated Woodpecker, Ruffed Grouse, Turkey, House Finch, Nuthatch, Pine Siskins.

The following birds are less common, but memorable: Snowy Owl, Grosbeaks, Snow Goose, Snow Bunting.